USE IT AGAIN - BUVETTE 2004

test model
$15.00
1. Same Old Moon.mp3

2. Use It Again.mp3

Ken Keppeler, Jeanie McLerie & Friends
A COLLECTION OF FOLK SONGS from the Southwest and the USA about
CACTUS, ANIMALS, RECYCLING AND OTHER FUN STUFF
in English, Spanish, and French.

1.Same Old Moon (© F. Leopold- J.McLerie/Buvette BMI) .
2. Use It Again (© J.McLerie - K.Keppeler/Buvette BMI)
3. Waltzing With Bears (© D.Marxen/Tomorrow River Music)
4. Greenfield Rocky Road (Trad.)
5. The Cactus Song (© J. McLerie - K. Keppeler/Buvette BMI)
6. Quit That Tickling Me (Trad.)
7. My Rhinoceros (© Edward Lipton)
8. Papa’s on the Housetop (Trad.)
9. Los Burros (Trad.)
10. Their Brains Were Small (©M.Graham/Paul Craft BMI) 11. Caballito Blanco/ Paul’s White Sox (© Elliott Johnson)
12. I’ve Got A Song (M. Reynolds/Schroeder Music)
13. Los Animales (Trad.)
14. Saute Crapaud (Trad.)
15. The Dynamite Reader (© J.McLerie-K.Keppeler/Buvette BMI)
16. Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star (© Words:Ann & Jane Taylor)

1. SAME OLD MOON - Jeanie and her Delta Sister, Frannie Leopold wrote this song about being far from the one you love. You can always make a connection through the moon. Try it and see.
2. USE IT AGAIN - Jeanie and Ken wrote this song to raise
recycles consciously, there will be less need for those huge landfills
awareness about the ever mounting garbage problem. If everybody
and dumps. Compost is a good way to start. Ken and Jeanie are
currently building a house in Silver City, New Mexico out of 86% recycled styrofoam/cement blocks.
3. WALTZING WITH BEARS - I heard this was written by Bob Force and Al D’Osche. It is a hilarious fantasy, and has attained almost cult status amongst BAYOU SECO fans worldwide.
4. GREENFIELD ROCKY ROAD - A jump rope song from Alabama. Dave Bryan sings it with aplomb.
5. THE CACTUS SONG - Jeanie wrote this to honor the noble cactus. Saguaros are not native to New Mexico, and ocotillos are technically euphorbias but they prickle a-plenty. The Tohono O’Odham people in southern Arizona lash the stalks together to make walls for their ramadas (outdoor rooms) which then sprout and grow, and also for their houses, which they then cover with mud.
6. QUIT THAT TICKLING ME - An Uncle Dave Macon song that Ken learned from Jim Griffith in Tucson. Add your own giggle track.
7. MY RHINOCEROS - A rhyming song, by Edward Lipton, where you need to fill in the last line. The verse about the chile and the banjo were added by Ken and Jeanie.
8. PAPA’S ON THE HOUSETOP - An old blues song from Leroy Carr and Scrapper Blackwell that Jeanie learned from her days with the Harmony Sisters. It has become a favorite wherever BAYOU SECO has played. Kids love the hand motions. Baby’s in the cradle (put your hands together next to your cheek, imitating sleep), Brother’s gone to town (pretend to drive a car), Sister’s in the parlour flying up and down (flap your arms up and down), Mama’s in the kitchen, messing all around (make like you’re stirring a cake), and Papa’s on the housetop and he won’t come down (point to the sky, and down to the ground).
9. LOS BURROS - Jeanie learned this song from two Swiss friends who learned it in Guatamala from a Peruvian singer in a market.
10. THEIR BRAINS WERE SMALL AND THEY DIED - a song from
the wonderful Mark Graham. The tuba adds a dinosauric touch.
11. CABALLITO BLANCO/PAUL’S WHITE SOCKS - Ken and Jeanie learned this tune from a wonderful Tohono O’Odham fiddler named Elliott Johnson in Cababi, Arizona. The first tune is a chotis (the step hop, skipping dance) and the second one a polka.
12. I’VE GOT A SONG - Malvina Reynolds wrote this classic.
Jeanie added the second verse. I dedicate this song to all children with breathing problems. As a childhood asthmatic, singing was something that saved me and always made me feel good. I couldn’t run, but I sure loved to sing. And so I keep on singing.
13. LOS ANIMALES - Jeanie learned this from a field recording by John Donald Robb in the University of New Mexico’s Archive of Southwestern Music. Robb collected it in Chama, N.M., from Anastasio Baca in 1951, who had learned it from a travelling entertainer in 1922.
14. SAUTE CRAPAUD - An old cajun song about the circle of life. Tadpoles loose tails and become frogs, but their babies will have tails for sure. The two additional verses by Jeanie are about a rabbit and some birds.
15. DYNAMITE READER - Jeanie wrote this one for the Albuquerque Public Library’s 1990 summer reading program. Sing along after each phrase.
16. TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR- Mozart wrote the tune when he was five, and the words come from Ann and Jane Taylor, we learned it from those fine musicians, Marcy Marxer and Cathy Fink. Any child who has ever learned to play an instrument knows this tune. I have played it many thousands of times, and dedicate it to all the children who take fiddle lessons. Obviously, I still love this tune.

USE IT AGAIN (original Version)
Jeanie McLerie and Ken Keppeler © 1991 Buvette Music- BMI

1. Recycle that bottle, recycle that can,
Let’s clean up the garbage that covers the land.
Throw those table scraps into a pile
And make enough compost to make your garden smile.

CHORUS:
RECYCLE THAT BOTTLE, RECYCLE THAT CAN,
LET’S CLEAN UP THE GARBAGE THAT COVERS THE LAND.
IF YOU USE IT ONCE, YOU GOTTA USE IT AGAIN,
AGAIN AND AGAIN, YOU’VE GOT TO USE IT AGAIN.

2. Stack those newspapers you won’t read again
Tie ‘em up and take ‘em to the recycling bin.
Those old drink cups of styrofoam
Can be turned into blocks to make a strong home.

3. What about those worn out pants,
The pretty flower dress you used to wear to the dance.
Tear ‘em up in squares without any guilt,
And sew ‘em up to make a nice heirloom quilt.

4. Orange peels, banana skins, and leftover rice,
Tea leaves, coffee grounds are also very nice.
Add a handful of red worms, some water and hay,
You’ll have compost in just a few days.

5. We all have a friend, his name is Mister Sun,
He shines down on everyone.
He can heat our homes, and light our lights,
He can even run our cars in the middle of the night.

WALTZING WITH BEARS
© D. Marxen/Tomorrow River Music

CHORUS:
HE GOES WA, WA, WA, WALTZING, WALTZING WITH BEARS,
RAGGY BEARS, BAGGY BEARS, SHAGGY BEARS TOO.
THERE’S NOTHING ON EARTH UNCLE WALTER WON’T DO,
SO HE CAN GO WALTZING, WA, WA, WA, WALTZING,
HE CAN GO WALTZING, GO WALTZING WITH BEARS.

1. I went to his room in the middle of the night,
I crept to his side and I turned on the light.
But to my surprise he was nowhere in sight,
‘Cause my Uncle Walter goes waltzing at night.

2. We gave Uncle Walter a new coat to wear,
But when he came home it was covered with hair.
And lately I’ve noticed several new tears,
I’m sure Uncle Walter’s been waltzing with bears.

3. We told Uncle Walter that he should be good,
And do all the things we said that he should,
But I know he would rather be off in the woods,
I’m afraid we will loose Uncle Walter for good.

4. We begged and we pleaded, “Oh, please won’t you stay,”
And managed to keep him home for a day.
But the bears all barged in and they dragged him away.
Now he’s dancing with pandas, and he won’t understand us,
And the bears all demand at least one dance a day.



CACTUS SONG
Jeanie McLerie and Ken Keppeler
© 1997 Buvette Music BMI

1. Big Saguaro is the father of them all
His arms curve up and he stands so tall
Little birds make their nests in a hole in his wall
Saguaro is the father of them all.

Chorus: CACTUS, CACTUS IT’S A PRICKLY PLANT,
IT’S FLOWERS ARE BRIGHT, AND IT DOESN’T LIKE THE
DAMP,
AROUND ITS FEET SNAKES AND LIZARDS DANCE,
CACTUS, CACTUS IS A PRICKLY PLANT.

2. Fat Barrilito is a beautiful sight
Straw-hued flowers in the pale moonlight
Fish hook spines give a terrible fright
Barrilito is a beautiful sight.

3. Graceful Ocotillo has long wavy arms
Red, red flowers in the Springtime warm
O’odham people use the stalks for their mud covered walls
Ocotillo has long wavy arms.

4. Prickly Pear has a big surprise
Sweet red fruit and that’s no lie
We can eat the leaves Nopales when we cut off the spines
Prickly Pear has a big surprise.

5. Cholla looks fuzzy in the bright sunlight
But you don’t want to touch it cause it jumps out to bite
Enjoy it from a distance and there won’t be a fight.
Cholla looks fuzzy in the bright sunlight.

LOS BURROS
Peru, traditional, learned in a Guatamalan market.

1. Cinco por ocho cuarenta, Five times eight is forty,
Cuarenta burros yo tengo. (2x) I have forty burros.

2. Y contigo, cuarenta uno, With you I have forty one,
Ya ti solito te quierro. (2x) But you are the only one I love.

3. Serena, morena, Serene and dark beauty,
Quiere me pues,
si eres buena.(2x) It is good if you love me.

4. Vaca, vaca, tu mama, Your mother is like a cow.
Toro, toro, tu papá. (2x) Your father is like a bull.

LOS ANIMALES
Recorded by John Donald Robb in La Jara N.M.in 1951
from the singing of Anastasio Baca who learned this in Chama N.M in 1922 from a travelling performer

1. Y es cuestión de ver al juez One ought to tell the judge
Lo que hacen los animales, How the animals behave,
Yo los vi cocer tamales, I saw a mouse and a centipede
Un ratón y un cintopiés. Making tamales.

2. Muchísimos guajolotes With great pleasure
Yo los vi con gran placer. I saw lots of turkeys
Yo los vi cocer camotes Cooking sweet potatoes
Y sacarlos a vender. And selling them outdoors.

3. Esto pasó por mi vista I saw this before my eyes
Y escúchenme, por favor. And listen closely please.
Vi un gato de motorista I saw a motor man cat
Yi un ratón de conductor. And a conductor rat.

CHORUS:
BAILARON LOS ANIMALES, The animals danced,
BAILORON HASTA LAS SIETE, They danced till seven.
UN OSO TOCABA EL PIANO, A bear played the piano
Y UNA LIEBRE EL CLARINETE. And a hare the clarinet.

DANCE, OH DANCE YOU ANIMALES,
DANCE, OH DANCE UNTIL THE DAWN
LET THE CACTUS PLAY THE FIDDLE,
ALLIGATOR ACCORDION.

4. Cuando se casó la rata When the rat got married
Hubo música especial . There was special music.
Le tocaron serenata, Three donkeys and a peacock
Tres burros y un pavo real. Serenaded her.

5. Le dieron la bienvenida They welcomed a bear
Y un oso por elegante Because of his elegance.
Se enamora de una hormiga The wife of an elephant
La mujer de un elefante. Fell in love with an ant.

6. Y el coyote se presenta And the coyote appeared
Poco después de la hora. A little after the hour.
El tocaba redoblante, He gave the double beat,
Y un conejo la tambora. And a rabbit played the drum.

7. Cuando ya se ensolaparon When they started crowding each other,
La culpa tuvo un conejo. A rabbit began it all.
Que una trompada se agarraron Five fleas and a crab
Cinco pulgas y un cangrejo. Started a fist fight.

8. Los charifes eran osos The sheriffs were bears,and
Y a la cárcel los llevaron, They took the noisy animals to jail.
En dies pesos los multaron Fining them ten pesos
Por ebrios y escandalosos. For drunkenness and disorder

9. Y este baile terminó This dance ended
Al estilo del gusano Like the tail end of a worm.
Que atrompada se agarraron What a fight broke out
Cinco pulgas y un marrano. Between five fleas and a pig!
SAUTE CRAPAUD
An old cajun song-
Verse 2 & 3 © Jeanie McLerie

1. Saute crapaud ta queue va bruler (burn),
Prends donc courage, un autre va repousser.

Jump Frog your tail must go
Just be brave, another will grow.

2. Saute ‘tit lapin, le fermier vient,
Prends ta carotte et va vite tres loin.

Jump little rabbit, the farmer is here.
Run with your carrot for danger is near.

3. Saute ‘tits oiseaux, vite dans le bois,
Le chat est ici, (il )va vous manger comme ca.
Jump little birds, quick in the brush.
The cat is here, he’ll eat you in a rush.

PAPA’S ON THE HOUSETOP
An old blues song from Scrapper Blackwell and Leroy Carr

CHORUS: BABY’S IN THE CRADLE, BROTHER’S GONE TO TOWN
SISTER’S IN THE PARLOUR, FLYING UP AND DOWN.
MAMA’S IN THE KITCHEN, MESSING ALL AROUND
PAPA’S ON THE HOUSETOP AND WON’T COME DOWN.

1. Mama made papa be quiet as a mouse.
Papa climbed up on top of the house.
Made a lot of whoppee, made a lot of noise,
Stood up and cheered with the rest of the boys.

2. The blues they come, the blues they come,
Nobody knows where those blues come from.
The blues they go, the blues they go,
Everybody’s happy when the old blues go.

3. Papa saw a chicken (soybean), out in the yard.
He picked up a rock and he hit him hard.
Hit him hard, killed him dead,
Now the chicken’s (tofu’s) in the gravy and the gravy’s on the bread. (vegetarian words)

4. Hush little baby, don’t you cry.
The blues are gonna leave you , by and by.
Papa’ll come down, sure as you’re born.
Put the baby in the cradle, throw the blues outdoors.

TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR
Words: Ann & Jane Taylor

1. Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are.
Up above the world so high, like a diamond in the sky,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are.

2. When the blazing Sun has gone, and he nothing shines upon.
Then you show your little light, twinkle, twinkle all the night,
Then the traveller in the dark, thanks you for your tiny spark.
He could not know which way to go, if you did not twinkle so,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are.

3. In the dark blue sky you keep, and offtimes thru my curtains peek.
Thought you never shut your eye, till the sun is in the sky,
As your bright and tiny spark, lights the traveller in the dark.
Though I know not what you are, twinkle ,twinkle little star,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are.

SAME OLD MOON
© 1994 Buvette Music - BMI
Music: Jeanie McLerie
Words: Jeanie McLerie & Frannie Leopold

CHORUS: SAME OLD MOON, SHINING ON YOU,
SHINING ON ME, THAT’S THE WAY IT SHOULD BE.
SPARKLING MOONBEAMS IN THE DARK BLUE,
SAME MOON SHING ON YOU.

1. Hey diddle diddle, the cat played the fiddle
The cow jumped over the moon and the little
Dog laughed, to see such a sport
And the dish ran away with the spoon.

2. Triangle of light, spanning the night
From my eyes to yours. We see the
Same moon from a different spot,
Same old moon.

3. Big moon balloon, sailing the night
Circling the world on it’s nocturnal flight.
Echoes of moon dreams, golden lagoon,
Sail on silvery moon.

BAYOU SECO is family of musicians led by Ken Keppeler and Jeanie McLerie. For twenty six years they have been delighting New Mexico and the World with their multi-cultural and multi-lingual songs of the Southwest and Beyond. Ken plays the 1 and 3 row diatonic accordians, fiddle, banjo, harmonica, jaw harp and he sings too. Jeanie plays guitar, five string fiddles, charango, and a bit of kazoo and does most of the singing. On this recording they are ablely joined by Terry Bluhm (electric and acoustic bass throughout); Jefferson Voorhees (drums #1,2,5,8, and Tarahumara drum#9), Stewart Mennin (clarinet# 1);
Mark Weaver (tuba#3,10,15);
Scott Mathis (vocals#3,7,8, mandolin#7,11);
Linda Askew (guitar#7,11,vocals#3&7); Dave Bryan(vocals #4,16); Blake Minnerly (tenor sax and guitar #2);
Scott Jarrett (egg shaker #2, drum #11, triangle #14).

WE DEDICATE this recording to all the Bayou Seco family, the folks before us who have kept this music alive, to everyone who has taught us songs and tunes, and to all our friends, old and new, out there and wherever they may be. A big thanks to the communities of Albuquerque and Silver City, who have given us so much support over the years. Also thanks to the Silver City elementary students from Mrs. Earlywine’s, Mrs. Rogers’, Mrs. Fellingham’s and Mrs. Murdock’s classes who did the recycled art in the cover photo, and to Chuck Pawlik for taking that wonderful photo.
Thanks to Manfred Pietrzok, maker of our Manzanita Guitar; to Stan Burg for the loan of two guitars; to Ken Keppeler and Peter White, makers of the four and five string violins and the mandolin.
Recorded, engineered and mixed Nov.98-Mar.99 at Thunderbird Studios,Edgewood N.M. by Scott Jarrett. Mastered by Eric Larson at Santa Fe Center Studios, Albuquerque, NM.
All songs were recorded live using M/S mic-ing with two coincident AKG TLII’s or with Crown SASS-P Stereo PZM mics. Overdubs were minimal.
Produced by Paul Hartsfield for Buvette Music, along with Ken Keppeler and Jeanie McLerie.